Coryell Award in Nuclear Chemistry


Charles Dubois Coryell
(photo courtesy of Endre Toth)

The Charles D. Coryell Award honors undergraduate students who have completed research projects in nuclear or nuclear-related areas. Each year there is a $1000 prize to be awarded to the successful nominee(s).   Contributions are judged on the basis of ingenuity, novelty, and potential usefulness. To be eligible, a student must have been an undergraduate at some time during the 12-month period prior to the deadline date for submission of applications for the award. The student may be sponsored by a faculty member at the home institution or by a research director at another institution where the student performed the work.
Nominations should consist of a two-page letter written by the person who directed the work that explicitly describes the student's role in the work and the student's written report. The written report could be anything that the student has written up as a summary of the work performed - it does not have to be a published article, or a manuscript in journal format, but something in the students' own words that describes the project and the results obtained. The complete nomination package should be no longer than 20 pages in length.

Submit nominations to:
Professor Graham F. Peaslee
Chemistry Department
Hope College
Holland, MI   49423
Ph: 616-395-7117
(peaslee@hope.edu)

The deadline for 2012 submissions is April 20, 2012
Please to not hesitate to contact Dr. Peaslee if you have any questions about the application process.

Previous Award Recipients

  2011 Ben Farr and Jeremy Townsend 2009 Robin Dienhoffer
2008 Pawan Rastogi 2006 Jill Pinter 2005 Gregory K. Pang
2004 Michelle L. Kovarik 2003 Michael Bridges 2002 Sean Liddick
2001 Peter Dorff 2000 Bryan Tomlin 1999 Jason Shergur
1998 David Ginger  1995 Glenn Fugate 1992 Kevin Schaab
1990 Christian D. Kacher 1988 Erin Renshaw 1987 John Kevin Donohue
1987 Shoshanna D. Rose 1986 Robert Maher 1985 Carolyn J. Anderson
1985 David R. Dorsett, Jr. 1984 Awanish C. Mishra 1983 C. Greg Pippin
1982 Susan L. Fraser 1981 Kenneth E. Gregorich 1980 Steven M. Montner
1979 Barbara Jacak 1978 Paul Solomon 1976 Richard F. Davis
1974 L. Sterna 1973 Saburo Yashita 1972 R.E. Leber
1971 M.D. Kluetz 1970 A.E. Salwin 1970 E. Gladney

2011 Coryell Award Winners
The Undergraduate Awards Committee of the Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society  would like to offer congratulations to Ben Farr and Jeremy Townsend of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville as the recipients of the 2011 Coryell Award. 


Ben Farr and Jeremy Townsend of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville receiving the 2011 Coryell Award from Mike Bronikowski of the Savannah River national Laboratory, 2011 NUCL Division Chair

2008 Coryell Award Winner
The Undergraduate Awards Committee of the division of Nuclear Chemistry and
Technology of the American Chemical Society  would like to offer
congratulations to Pawan Rastogi as the recipient of the 2008 Coryell
Award.  Pawan is a student at Columbia University.


Pawan Rastogi of Columbia University receiving the 2008 Coryell Award from Graham Peaslee of Hope College, NUCL Education Committee Chair

2006 Coryell Award Winner
The Undergraduate Awards Committee of the division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society  would like to offer congratulations to Jill S. Pinter as the recipient of the 2006 Coryell Award.  Jill is a student at the Hope College and did her research
under the direction of Profs. Ken Brown, Paul DeYoung, and Graham Peaslee.  She is currently a graduate student at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory  at Michigan State University.


Jill Pinter receiving the 2006 Coryell Undergraduate research Award from Darleane Hoffman

A short write-up about Jill's research:

Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry in the Investigation of Film Thickness and Uniformity on Chemically Modified Electrodes

Jill S. Pinter, Kenneth L. Brown, Paul A. DeYoung, and Graham F. Peaslee, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, Hope College, Holland Michigan 49422-9000.

Abstract Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) is an analytical technique that is used to determine the structure and composition of materials by impinging an ion beam on a sample and detecting the backscattered ions. RBS was used to characterize the intrinsic properties of a thin organic film composed of the ruthenium complex, [(bpy)2Ru(5-phenNH2)]Cl2 • H2O, on a glassy carbon electrode. The film was placed on the electrode surface via electropolymerization, such that the thickness of the film depends on the number of cycles of electropolymerization. A 1.7 MV Pelletron tandem particle accelerator at the Hope College Ion Beam Analysis Laboratory (HIBAL) was used to produce a beam of He2+ ions at 4.533 MeV. The beam was focused on the glassy carbon portion of the electrode with beam spot ~1 mm in diameter. The backscattered ions were detected at 169.7° by a silicon surface-barrier detector with a solid angle of ~4 msr. The results show that the film has an unusual composition of two layers: an outer layer of uniform ruthenium concentration, and an inner layer that starts at the same uniform ruthenium concentration, but decreases linearly to the electrode surface. The total amount of ruthenium present in the films was found to increase linearly with the number of electropolymerization cycles, and the same trend is observed for film thickness as well. The thickness of the films was determined to range between 1000 to 2500 nm for 5 to 20 electropolymerization cycles, respectively.

2005 Coryell Award Winner
The Undergraduate Awards Committee of the division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society  would like to offer congratulations to Gregory K. Pang as the recipient of the 2005 Coryell
Award.  Gregory is a student at the University of California - Berkeley and did his research under the direction of Prof. Heino Nitsche and Dr. Ch. Düllmann.


Gregory K. Pang, from the University of California - Berkeley receiving the 2005 Coryell Award from DNCT Selection Committee Chair Graham Peaslee of Hope College (MI) at the 2005 San Diego ACS National Meeting

A short write-up about Gregory's research:

Online and Offline Gas-phase Chemistry of the Lighter Homologues of Rutherfordium

Gregory K. Pang  Mentors: Dr. Ch. Düllmann and Prof. H. Nitsche

Abstract: The gas phase chemistry of the group 4 elements (Zr, Hf) complexed with fluorinated β-diketones, specifically hexafluroacetylacetone (hfa) and trifluoroacetylacetone (tfa) was investigated. Two sets of experiments were performed: In the offline regime with macroamounts of stable isotopes, and in the online regime with short-lived isotopes (85Zr, 158/162/165/169Hf) produced in heavy-ion induced fusion reactions. These experiments were designed as a model study to prepare a future experiment with Rutherfordium (Rf, Z = 104). The offline studies comprised thermosublimatography experiments in a temperature gradient tube to investigate the thermochemistry of the Zr/Hf – hfa system. In the online regime, attention was paid to parameters that will be important in an experiment on a one-atom-at-a-time scale (in the case of Rf), namely maximum speed and yield. A maximum yield of ~90% for the 3.24 min. isotope 169Hf was reached showing that the system is feasible for a Rf experiment. Successful application of this chemical system to a Rutherfordium experiment would result in the first transactinide compound with organic ligands.

2004 Coryell Award Winner
The Undergraduate Awards Committee of the division of Nuclear Chemistry and
Technology of the American Chemical Society  would like to offer
congratulations to
Michelle L. Kovarik as the recipient of the 2004 Coryell
Award.  Michelle is a student at Saint Louis University and did her research
with the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Kentucky.
Her mentors were Dr. Michael Jay and graduate student Jim Weekley, and
the title of her research was “Development and Application of
Nanosuspension Liquid Scintillation Counting Fluid.”


Michelle L. Kovarik, from Saint Louis university receiving the 2004 Coryell Award from DNCT Selection Committee Chair Graham Peaslee of Hope College (MI)

A short write-up about Michelle's research:
(Michelle's poster will be presented at the March National ACS meeting in Anaheim. Her poster is CHED #736 in the Monday 2-4 PM Undergraduate Research poster session in Hall A of the conference center.)

Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) currently accounts for 71% of mixed radioactive, organic waste.  Development of an aqueous-based scintillation cocktail is desirable to reduce the amount of mixed waste produced. 
Polymerization of styrene-in-water microemulsions was used to entrap LSC fluor molecules, 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and p-bis(o-methylstyryl)-benzene (bis-MSB), in polystyrene nanoparticles to create an aqueous suspension.   These nanosuspensions were characterized using quasi-elastic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy and optimized with respect to PPO concentration, surfactant molecule(s), and styrene purification.  The nanosuspensions were used successfully to count various aqueous samples, including biological samples of digested blood and tissue.  Optimized nanosuspensions yielded counting efficiencies for 14C-acetic acid of up to 46% compared to commercially available LSC cocktail.

2003 Coryell Award Winner
The Undergraduate Awards Committee of the division of Nuclear Chemistry and
Technology of the American Chemical Society  would like to offer
congratulations to
Michael Bridges as the recipient of the 2003 Coryell
Award.  Michael is a student at the University of British Columbia and did his
research at TRIUMF. His mentors were Don Fleming and Khashayar Ghandi
and the title of his research was: "Muonium and Muoniated Free Radical Formation
and Radiation Chemistry in Sub- and Supercritical Carbon Dioxide".

 
Michael Bridges, from the University of British Columbia
receiving the 2003 Coryell Award from Sherry Yennello.

A short write-up about Mike's research:

There is a great potential for use of supercritical (SC) solvents (in particular, SC-CO2) for the extraction of unstable isotopes from nuclear waste. The main concern when handling solvents and reaction vessels after extraction of this waste is their level of radioactivity. When using supercritical solvents such as CO2, in which UO2 is extremely soluble, the temperature and pressure of the solvent can be adjusted quite easily to change its density (drastically!). High SC-CO2 density thermalizes radioactive decay products (radiation) so that they do not reach the vessel walls (or the outside)

Using the MuSR technique at TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, the positive muon was injected into supercritical carbon dioxide at varying densities. Its intra- track spur formation (the degree to which the muon ionizes the solvent (CO2) and those high-energy electrons travel, thus forming radiation of their own) was closely studied using a MuSR Spectrometer.

Better understanding of  "spur formation" in supercritical CO2 allows us to tune its temperature and pressure to the ideal levels for the safe use in UO2 extraction.

2000 Coryell Award Winner


Bryan Tomlin, from Clark University receiving the 2000 Coryell Award from Sherry Yennello.

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